“America The Beautiful” at Jack O’ Lantern Show

Visitors look at a display with three giant pumpkins in the Laughing Tree section at the fourth annual Jack O' Lantern Spectacular Thursday night at Iroquois Park.

Visitors look at a display with three giant pumpkins in the Laughing Tree section at the fourth annual Jack O’ Lantern Spectacular Thursday night at Iroquois Park.

courier-journal-161016-sunday-metro
Wooded hiking trail in Iroquois Park hosts pumpkin art display

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY BRIAN BOHANNON
SPECIAL TO COURIER-JOURNAL, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016
The annual Jack O’ Lantern Spectacular opened at dusk on Thursday in Iroquois Park, where visitors toured the artistically carved, illuminated pumpkins on display along a quarter- mile hiking trail in the woods near the Iroquois Amphitheater.
This year’s theme, “America The Beautiful,” is set to music in scenes dedicated to states and current events.
Erika Nelson, community relations administrator with Louisville Metro Parks & Recreation, said with 3,528 visitors, Thursday could be the best opening night to date.
The Jack O’ Lantern Spectacular runs through Nov. 6, and is open from dusk until 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and from dusk until midnight Friday and Saturday.
Tickets range from $9 to $15, with discounts for seniors and children 12 and under. Proceeds benefit the Louisville Parks Foundation, which raises money for Metro Parks projects.
Fore more information, check out www.jackolanternlouisville.com or visit www.iroquoisamphitheater.com.

Lonely in the kitchen: Restaurant worker shortage hits Louisville

Here’s another restaurant/food story … (With much thanks to Chef/Owners Kathy Cary of Lilly’s and La Peche, Anoosh Shariat and Paula Barmore of anoosh Bistro and Noosh Nosh and Louvino’s owner Chad Coulter for allowing me into their kitchens and dining rooms for photos.)

Chef/Owner Kathy Cary of Lilly's Bistro and La Peche Gourmet-To-Go looks up between preparing dishes in the kitchen for the carryout counter. Monday, Aug. 15, 2016.

Chef/Owner Kathy Cary of Lilly’s Bistro and La Peche Gourmet-To-Go looks up between preparing dishes in the kitchen for the carryout counter.

On the stands today: “Lonely in the kitchen: Restaurant worker shortage hits Louisville,” a LEO Weekly feature by Susan Riegler about how the locally-owned restaurants we enjoy in Louisville are dealing with hiring new staff.

For some restaurants, it has led to signing bonuses. (Go read the story for more about that.) For me, it was about blur, yet with something in focus.

For this assignment, I spent time shooting during breakfast at Noosh Nosh and anoosh Bistro, during lunch and dinner in Lilly’s kitchen and then during dinner at Louvino. Probably more time than I needed to at Lilly’s, but I was directed to “shoot something artsy” by Keith Stone, managing editor at the LEO, for their square cover. So I was there dragging the shutter and panning the motion of server Rosalie Guthrie as she expedited food, walking backward in front of her to the dining room. Generally, getting in her way. I tried rear curtain synch on Allen Grimm, Chef de Cuisine, while he prepared dishes. Blur, baby, blur! Lilly’s Chef/Owner Kathy Cary walked past the camera, rendered as a ghost passing the in-focus staff in the background.

After all that, they choose a great portrait of Cary for the cover, standing still and looking at the camera.

Here’s a gallery of more images from the assignment:


Cards Give Back – American Football Without Barriers Camp

Donovan Pleasant, 13, an eighth-grader at Ramsey Middle School, has a one-on-one session with Gary Barnidge, a co-founder of the American Football Without Barriers youth football camp, during practice Saturday June 25, 2016 at the University of Louisville's Papa John's Cardinal Stadium.

Donovan Pleasant, 13, an eighth-grader at Ramsey Middle School, has a one-on-one session with Gary Barnidge, a co-founder of the American Football Without Barriers youth football camp, during practice Saturday June 25, 2016 at the University of Louisville’s Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium.

AMERICAN FOOTBALL WITHOUT BARRIERS CAMP AT U OF L

I photographed the American Football Without Barriers Camp at U of L Saturday for the Sunday, June 26, 2016 edition of The Courier-Journal. Many thanks to Kasey Mathes, our UL media contact for feeding me names! She was awesome to have near.

It was hot in the midday sun beaming down on Papa John’s Stadium. But the former UL football players/current NFL players were cool as could be running practice drills for the city’s future football greats, and the kids were sweating hard and loving it. So were Angela Shoemaker, shooting video, and I, as we worked the scene. Mopping my brow between periods of shooting, I’d find Angela taking refuge in the shade. Time to join her, and give her hell for taking a break. This was supposed to be held in the Trager Indoor Center, but it had AC issues, and the kids could say they played on the stadium field.

Donovan Pleasant, 13, an eighth-grader at Ramsey Middle School, fist bumps Gary Barnidge, a co-founder of the American Football Without Barriers youth football camp, Saturday, June 25, 2016 after a one-on-one session at the University of Louisville's Papa John's Cardinal Stadium.

Donovan Pleasant, 13, an eighth-grader at Ramsey Middle School, fist bumps Gary Barnidge, a co-founder of the American Football Without Barriers youth football camp, Saturday, June 25, 2016 after a one-on-one session at the University of Louisville’s Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium.

In the midst of all the group drills, one student was getting one-on-one attention from one of the camp co-founders, ex-Card and current NFL player Gary Barnidge. Barnidge led the kid through at least four different drills down in a corner of the field. I got the student’s name, Donovan Pleasant, 13, an eighth-grader at Ramsey Middle School, after the first one and kept looking back to find them doing something else. At the end of their time together, I captured them doing a fist bump.

I caught Barnidge walking across the field and asked, “How did that kid end up with a personal session with you?” He looked off smiling and said, “Yeah, I should send him a bill for $4000,” and went on to explain that he wasn’t paired with any other players, so he had nothing else to do. “The kid asked me, so I worked with him.”

I found Donovan Pleasant again before their lunch break as I was leaving. I told him how awesome that was – he worked out with an NFL player! I pointed out that he had asked for what he wanted and got it, and to remember to always do so in the future. How could he forget?

See the whole gallery of images in my archive: Cards Give Back – American Football Without Barriers Camp

Waiting for Ali

Niye Ha Williams-Hill of Jeffersonville, Ind., photographs her daughters Evangeline, 1, and Viviana, 6, holding a flag, while on the Belvedere watch the June 10, 2016 Muhammad Ali funeral procession pause on Interstate 64 before exiting downtown at 9th Street.

Niye Ha Williams-Hill of Jeffersonville, Ind., photographs her daughters Evangeline, 1, and Viviana, 6, holding a flag, while on the Belvedere watch the June 10, 2016 Muhammad Ali funeral procession pause on Interstate 64 before exiting downtown at 9th Street.


My first few frames shot on the Belvedere Friday when I arrived to stake out my position for the photo of the Muhammad Ali funeral procession to pass by on I-64 before exiting onto 9th Street were in color, then black and white … A woman brought her daughters and made a nice feature with the flag. They were actually there for the event. It made a better B&W than color, but didn’t want to send it to The C-J as a “mistake.” I don’t know what setting it was on, just glad I fixed it before shooting more.
Intead, tweeted a picture of the Muhammad Ali Center and I-64 waiting for the arrival of The Greatest.
Spoke with other photographers and waited for traffic to stop on I-64W, a sure sign of his arrival.
After almost four hours of standing there, traffic did stop, and police cars whizzed by. The procession followed, and stopped across from the Ali Center. Eastbound traffic stopped too, and photojournalists jumped out of the back of an SUV that was riding ahead of the hearse. You could hear the folks on the Belvedere chanting, “Ali, Ali,” in a video I made with my phone. It all lasted a few minutes. The motorcade took off, people left the railing and waited for the memorial to begin.
For me, off to edit and sent out photos.

The Muhammad Ali Center for the Associated Press, 2012

It was with great sadness that I learned of the passing of Muhammad Ali Saturday morning. My love and condolences go out to his family, friends and the people who worked with him, along with the public at large. He was an international icon loved and respected by all, and Louisville will miss him the most. But his presence will last forever.
While I’ve never been introduced to Muhammad Ali or had my photo taken with him, I’ve been near him on many occasions on assignment for the AP or shooting the Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Awards for the Ali Center. Many of my AP file photos from a 2012 assignment are being used now.
Here’s the gallery I sent at that time.
Rest in peace, Ali.