Tag:LEO Weekly

The 2017 Kentuckiana Pride Parade


Scenes along the the Kentuckiana Pride Parade Route

See the colors of love and pride on parade with additional photos of the festival by Kathryn Harrington. See the event at the LEO Weekly online: Photo Set: 2017 Kentuckiana Pride Festival

Interested in purchasing a digital download or print from this gallery? Photos Available for Purchase

LEO Weekly: UofL Baseball Star Brendan McKay

University of Louisville star Brendan McKay pitches Friday, April 7, 2017 as U of L (25-3, 10-2 ACC) hosts No. 22 Wake Forest (22-8, 8-4) for the first of a three-game series at Jim Patterson Stadium. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)

Today the LEO Weekly published a story by Creig Ewing on UofL’s star pitcher/hitter Brendan McKay, UofL’s Major League Baseball double threat Brendan McKay that I shot at a cold Friday night game in April. It was the first time I’d shot baseball in ages! I had to walk back to the car for my jacket after the second inning or freeze.

It certainly helps to not have to worry about game action and only focus on one player. Thankfully he played all but the last inning, so there were plenty of opportunities to catch him at work.

When he returned to the dugout, I kept watching for his face from where I was allowed to shoot from along the first base line. He leaned over the rail to watch the last inning and I made about four different versions of him there. the Leo used the one where he’s looking at the camera, but I liked him looking out, as a guy standing to the right of McKay kept moving, changing the background.

At the end I was supposed to meet with the media rep and go out on the field with the players. He wasn’t around, so I went on out looking for a last photo of McKay. The coach was talking to his players and I was walking around when I heard a whistle and a “hey.” A different coach caught me and chastised me for being on the field as we returned to the dugout. Without explaining, I said I was sorry, and left.

Groups protest Pence visit to Louisville, Ky.

Protesting Pence – LEO Weekly story and photos

Groups protest Pence visit to Louisville, Ky.
Chanelle Helm, a Black Lives Matter of Louisville organizer, delivers her message to protesters gathered in front of Indivisible Kentucky’s Save My Care Bus. Groups protest the Republican Party’s proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act during a visit by Vice President Mike Pence with Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin and business leaders Saturday, March 11, 2017 at Trane Parts and Distribution Center, 12850 Plantside Drive, Louisville, Ky. (Photo by Brian B. I was happy with the way he framed it in light of the upcoming visit by President Trump himselfohannon)

LEO Weekly March 15, 2017 cover.Many thanks to Keith Stone, managing editor at LEO Weekly, for asking me to shoot this and get quotes and write a copy block. He positioned the story well with a tweak to the lede that made it a warm-up to President Trump’s upcoming visit. Glad to also have my photos run online and for the online teaser inside the next issue. See the story and photos in the LEO Weekly March 15, 2017 issue.

Chef/Owner Kathy Cary of Lilly's Bistro and La Peche Gourmet-To-Go looks up between preparing dishes in the kitchen for the carryout counter.

Lonely in the kitchen: Restaurant worker shortage hits Louisville

Here’s another restaurant/food story … (With much thanks to Chef/Owners Kathy Cary of Lilly’s and La Peche, Anoosh Shariat and Paula Barmore of anoosh Bistro and Noosh Nosh and Louvino’s owner Chad Coulter for allowing me into their kitchens and dining rooms for photos.)

Chef/Owner Kathy Cary of Lilly's Bistro and La Peche Gourmet-To-Go looks up between preparing dishes in the kitchen for the carryout counter. Monday, Aug. 15, 2016.
Chef/Owner Kathy Cary of Lilly’s Bistro and La Peche Gourmet-To-Go looks up between preparing dishes in the kitchen for the carryout counter.

On the stands today: “Lonely in the kitchen: Restaurant worker shortage hits Louisville,” a LEO Weekly feature by Susan Riegler about how the locally-owned restaurants we enjoy in Louisville are dealing with hiring new staff.

For some restaurants, it has led to signing bonuses. (Go read the story for more about that.) For me, it was about blur, yet with something in focus.

For this assignment, I spent time shooting during breakfast at Noosh Nosh and anoosh Bistro, during lunch and dinner in Lilly’s kitchen and then during dinner at Louvino. Probably more time than I needed to at Lilly’s, but I was directed to “shoot something artsy” by Keith Stone, managing editor at the LEO, for their square cover. So I was there dragging the shutter and panning the motion of server Rosalie Guthrie as she expedited food, walking backward in front of her to the dining room. Generally, getting in her way. I tried rear curtain synch on Allen Grimm, Chef de Cuisine, while he prepared dishes. Blur, baby, blur! Lilly’s Chef/Owner Kathy Cary walked past the camera, rendered as a ghost passing the in-focus staff in the background.

After all that, they choose a great portrait of Cary for the cover, standing still and looking at the camera.

Here’s a gallery of more images from the assignment:


New Legacy’s building on Garvin Place in Old Louisville. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)

New Faces of Hope, breaking the prison cycle

I provided photos for a Michael L. Jones story that appeared on the June 1, 2016 cover of the LEO Weekly, “New Faces of Hope, breaking the prison cycle“.

Gisela Nelson, executive director of New Legacy Reentry Corp,, and husband Paul Nelson, Sr., show the remodeling work completed in the building where New Legacy is housed. They have seven community members living in their building on Garvin Place. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)
Gisela Nelson, executive director of New Legacy Reentry Corp,, and husband Paul Nelson, Sr., show the remodeling work completed in the building where New Legacy is housed. They have seven community members living in their building on Garvin Place. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)
LEO Weekly Jan.1, 2016 cover, "New Faces of Hope, breaking the prison cycle."
LEO Weekly Jan.1, 2016 cover, “New Faces of Hope, breaking the prison cycle.”
Here’s hope for a solution to chronic recidivism using the model provided by New Legacy Reentry Corporation.

The feature profiles Gisela Nelson and her husband Paul Nelson Sr., who formed the New Legacy Reentry Corp., a faith-based organization that hopes to break the cycle of chronic recidivism for ex-offenders who have been incarcerated for nonviolent, nonsexual crimes. When the convict leaves prison, they’re given a place to live, a job and a chance to restart their life in a supportive environment. They’re an inspiring couple with a successful program.

“Families Behind Bars: The Cycle of Imprisonment” by Michael L. Jones

LEO Weekly Jan. 20, 2016 cover story: Families behind bars: The cycle of imprisonment by Michael L. JonesI shot the photos for the story published in the Jan. 20, 2016 issue of the LEO Weekly, “Families Behind Bars: The Cycle of Imprisonment” by Michael L. Jones.

I worked with Michael on this piece on the the costs of incarceration on the families of the incarcerated over five shoots, two at the jail. We spoke with those affected the most, the family members waiting for the release of loved ones and those in jail waiting to go home, and the jailers that keep them.

“Communities pay a high cost for the cycle of imprisonment — both literally and figuratively. Metro Corrections has about 1,800 prisoners on any given day. Bolton says it costs $72 a day to incarcerate a prisoner. The charges go up to $340 a day if the inmate has physical or mental health issues. According to the Prison Policy Initiative, Kentucky has the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world. Our state imprisons 948 people per 100,000 residents compared to the national average of 716 people for every 100,000 residents, which is still higher than most industrial nations.”

Here’s a gallery of some of the portraits made for the story:


Gary Brice leads the chant for FOP President Dave Mutchler "to go" following his controversial letter last week during the FOP Action protest outside Louisville Metro Police Headquarters at Seventh and Jefferson Streets, June 22, 2015. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)

FOP Action Protest

LEO Weekly June 24, 2015 cover story by Michael L. Jones:

People fill the crosswalk to stop traffic during the FOP Action protest outside Louisville Metro Police Headquarters at Seventh and Jefferson Streets, June 22, 2015. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)
People fill the crosswalk to stop traffic during the FOP Action protest outside Louisville Metro Police Headquarters at Seventh and Jefferson Streets, June 22, 2015. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)

The shooting, the letter and the protest

Protesters gathered outside the Louisville Metro Police Department in response to the open letter in the Courier-Journal by Sgt. Dave Mutchler, president of the River City FOP Lodge 614, following the June 13 shooting death of Sudanese immigrant Deng Manyoun by LMPD Officer Nathan Blanford. A “Face-To-Face” community forum followed that evening at 4th Street United Methodist Church in Old Louisville. See the story and photos, FOP Action Protest

LEO Weekly June 24, 2015 Cover
LEO Weekly June 24, 2015 Cover

 

Here’s a slideshow of my take:


Face To Face Community Forum

Tom Moffett, a member of the Kentucky Alliance against Racist and Political Repression, tells Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad that after seeing video of the confrontation between Deng Manyoun and Officer Nathan Blanford, "even he would not have been scared," at the "Face-To-Face" Community Form sponsored by Louisville Metro District 6 Councilman David A. James at the 4th Street United Methodist Church in Old Louisville. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)
Tom Moffett, a member of the Kentucky Alliance against Racist and Political Repression, tells Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad that after seeing video of the confrontation between Deng Manyoun and Officer Nathan Blanford, “even he would not have been scared,” at the “Face-To-Face” Community Form sponsored by Louisville Metro District 6 Councilman David A. James at the 4th Street United Methodist Church in Old Louisville. (Photo by Brian Bohannon)

Here’s a slideshow of my take:


LEO – American Slaves, Inc.

A photo essay to accompany Michael L. Jones’ feature story on American Slaves, Inc., it’s founder Norris Shelton and the First Church of American Slaves. The story appeared on the cover of the Nov. 16, 2011 issue of the LEO Weekly in Louisville, Ky.

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Michael Jones wrote a follow-up to this story for the LEO Weekly, Mr. Silk goes to Frankfort